What is Grid Computing?

What is Grid Computing?

Grid computing is the collection of computer resources from multiple locations to reach a common goal. The grid can be thought of as a distributed system with non-interactive workloads that involve a large number of files.

What distinguishes grid computing from conventional high performance computing systems such as cluster computing is that grids tend to be more loosely coupled, heterogeneous, and geographically dispersed.

Grid computing combines computers from multiple administrative domains to reach a common goal, to solve a single task, and may then disappear just as quickly.

One of the main strategies of grid computing is to use middleware to divide and apportion pieces of a program among several computers, sometimes up to many thousands. Grid computing involves computation in a distributed fashion, which may also involve the aggregation of large-scale clusters.

The term is most commonly used for software that enables communication and management of data in distributed applications. In this more specific sense middleware can be described as “the dash in ‘client-server’” (or the ‘-to-‘ in peer-to-peer for that matter) 

What is Middleware?

Middleware is computer software that provides services to software applications beyond those available from the operating system. It can be described as “software glue”. Middleware makes it easier for software developers to perform communication and input/output, so they can focus on the specific purpose of their application.

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